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Mobilizing Your Defense Force
By Dr. Winston Craig

            C
olds and the flu frequently come our way in the colder months. These acute illnesses account for about one-third of absenteeism from school and time lost from work ill the United States. In the cold winter months, it is important that we keep our resistance to infections high by having our immune system functioning at an optimal level. A battery of  elite killer cells (such as T-cells, B-cells, and natural killer cells) stand ever ready to protect us against invading disease forces.

            A number of lifestyle factors such as chronic stress, sleep deprivation, excessive fatigue, alcohol, and a high sugar diet can lower our resistance to disease. Since normal aging is accompanied by a decline in immune function, the elderly must be very careful to follow a healthy lifestyle. Poor eating habits leading to deficiencies  of iron, zinc, vitamin A, or vitamin C can also impair the working of the immune system, producing a greater susceptibility to disease.

            February is a month when SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) and cabin fever are all too common. During the extensive months of a northern winter we may experience depression along with the grey skies, and shortened days with limited sunshine, Negative emotional states such as depression and loneliness are known to disable the immune system, while a positive mental outlook enhances immune function.

positive attitude            Nothing tends to promote health more than a spirit of cheerfulness and contentment. When the mind  is  happy from a sense of duty well done, and there is the satisfaction of helping others, one will experience a surge of health (MH 257). Norman  Cousins reminds us that hope and purpose are not merely mental states- they have electrochemical connections that play a major part in boosting the immune system.

            A healthy immune system is safe-guarded not only by having a positive mental attitude, but also from eating plenty of fruits and vegetables rich ill protective anti-inflammatory agents, getting adequate sleep, learning to relax, and drinking plenty of water Ecbinacea and garlic can enhance  the immune function and protect against upper respiratory tract infections such as throat infections, colds and flu. Vitamin C supplements are not really effective at reducing the incidence of colds, but they can somewhat diminish the severity and duration of colds.

            Regular exercise is an important way to enhance immune function. In one study, sedentary women who were asked to walk 45 minutes a day, five times a week, had less severe upper respiratory infections than the women who did not exercise, and the colds and flu experienced by the exercising women lasted only half as long.

By Winston Craig, PhD
Andrews Univeristy

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Books by Dr. Winston Craig


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Colds and the flu frequently come our way ill the colder  months. These acute illnesses account for about one-third of absenteeism from school and time lost from work ill the United States. In the cold winter months, it is important that we keep our resistance to infections high by having
our immune system functioning at an optimal level. A battery of  elite killer cells (such as T-cells, B-cells, and natural killer cells) stand ever ready to protect us against invading disease forces.

A number of lifestyle factors such as chronic stress, sleep deprivation, excessive fatigue, alcohol, and a high sugar diet can lower our resistance to disease. Since normal aging is accompanied by a decline m immune function, the elderly must be very careful to follow a healthy lifestyle. Poor eating habits leading to deficiencies  of iron, zinc, vitamin A, or vitamin C can also impair the working of the immune system, producing a greater susceptibility to disease.

Colds and the flu frequently come our way ill the colder  months. These acute illnesses account for about one-third of absenteeism from school and time lost from work ill the United States. In the cold winter months, it is important that we keep our resistance to infections high by having
our immune system functioning at an optimal level. A battery of  elite killer cells (such as T-cells, B-cells, and natural killer cells) stand ever ready to protect us against invading disease forces.

A number of lifestyle factors such as chronic stress, sleep deprivation, excessive fatigue, alcohol, and a high sugar diet can lower our resistance to disease. Since normal aging is accompanied by a decline m immune function, the elderly must be very careful to follow a healthy lifestyle. Poor eating habits leading to deficiencies  of iron, zinc, vitamin A, or vitamin C can also impair the working of the immune system, producing a greater susceptibility to disease.

February is a month when SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) and cabin fever are all too common. During the extensive months of a northern winter we may experience depression along with the grey skies, and shortened days with limited sunshine, Negative emotional states such as depression and loneliness are known ~ o disable the immune system, while a positive mental outlook enhances immune function.

Nothing tends to promote health more than a spirit of cheerfulness and contentment. When the mind  is  happy from a sense of duty well done, and there is the satisfaction of helping others, one will experience a surge of health (MH 257). Norman  Cousins reminds us that hope and purpose are not merely mental states- they have electrochemical connections that play a major part in boosting the immune system.

A healthy immune system is safe-guarded not only by having a positive mental attitude, but also from eating plenty of fruits and vegetables rich ill protective anti-inflammatory agents, getting adequate sleep, learning to relax, and drinking plenty of water Ecbinacea and garlic can enhance  the immune function and protect against upper respiratory tract infections such as throat infections, colds and flu. Vitamin C supplements are not really effective at reducing the incidence of colds, but they can
somewhat diminish the severity and duration of colds Regular exercise is an important way to enhance immune function. In one study, sedentary women who were asked to walk 45 minutes a day, five times a week, had less severe upper respiratory infections than the women who did not exercise, and the colds and flu experienced by the exercising women lasted only half as long.

February is a month when SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) and cabin fever are all too common. During the extensive months of a northern winter we may experience depression along with the grey skies, and shortened days with limited sunshine, Negative emotional states such as depression and loneliness are known ~ o disable the immune system, while a positive mental outlook enhances immune function.

Nothing tends to promote health more than a spirit of cheerfulness and contentment. When the mind  is  happy from a sense of duty well done, and there is the satisfaction of helping others, one will experience a surge of health (MH 257). Norman  Cousins reminds us that hope and purpose are not merely mental states- they have electrochemical connections that play a major part in boosting the immune system.

A healthy immune system is safe-guarded not only by having a positive mental attitude, but also from eating plenty of fruits and vegetablesrich ill protective anti-inflammatory agents, getting adequate sleep, learning to relax, and drinking plenty of water Ecbinacea and garlic can enhance  the immunefunction and protect against upper respiratory tract infections such as throat infections, colds and flu. Vitamin C supplements are not really effective at reducing the incidence of colds, but they can
somewhat diminish the severity and duration of colds Regular exercise is an important way to enhance immune function. In one study, sedentary women who were asked to walk 45 minutes a day, five times a week, had less severe upper respiratory infections than the women who did not exercise, and the colds and flu experienced by the exercising women lasted only half as long.